Pantops Pet Salon
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Pantops Pet Salon & Spa
Charlottesville's Professional Dog Grooming

It's what we do -- it's all we do.

(434) 293-2424
Fax: (434) 293-8231
504 Pantops Center
Charlottesville, VA 22911

Archive for April, 2007

The Maltese

Tuesday, April 24th, 2007 by Mike Cronk

Basics:
Country of Origin:  Italy
Group:  Toy
Lifespan: 12-14 years
Height:  No standard
Weight:  4-7 lbs
Color:  White
AKC Rank 2006:  18

The Maltese
This is one of our favorite companion dogs.  With proper breeding, they are highly affectionate, well-mannered and adjust well to a family environment.  Due to their petite size and gentle nature, they are perfect for adults and older children but handling by young children (under 10 years) should be monitored.  Minimal exercise is fine for this easy-going dog.

While the breed standard calls for a long coat well to the floor, all of our customers like some scissoring to minimize their brushing and combing and to maintain cleanliness.  The hair on the top of the head, if allowed to grow, is tied up into either one or two top knots (pony tails).  Most of our Maltese owners prefer not to deal with tying up the hair and choose bangs instead.
The most popular cut is our summer cut with bangs.  We scissor the legs, chest, and tail 1.5-2 inches long.  In addition to bangs, muzzles are trimmed to 1.5 inches as well.  We also do a lot of “personality cuts” where the body and legs are clipped all over from 1/4 of an inch to 1 inch all over with bangs and a short beard.

When it comes to grooming, this is a gentle natured dog.  Keep in mind that the longer the coat, the more frequent your combing and brushing should be at home as they can matt up quickly.

The Miniature Schnauzer

Tuesday, April 24th, 2007 by Mike Cronk

 

Basics:
Country of Origin:  Germany
Group:  Terrier
Lifespan:  12-14 years
Height:  12-14 inches
Weight:  13-15 lbs
Color:  Black-silver-grey
AKC Rank 2006:  10

The Miniature Schnauzer
Adjectives used to describe the Miniature Schnauzer say it all:  engaging, bouncy, spunky, scrappy, playful and alert.  This most popular of the terriers is a great family pet but would definitely demand and deserve a lot of attention.  If you have a nice fenced-in backyard or plan to go on long walks daily, this may be your dog.  But if you want to lead a quiet lifestyle, stay away from the Schnauzer!

Our experience in the shop has been that the Schnauzer typically does not take well to grooming, but can be taught.  They are almost considered non-shedding which is a plus for many owners. But they do have a double coat and their fine undercoat needs weekly brushing.  Neglect of the beard and leg feathering leads to matting in short order.  Due to their propensity toward matting, we are called upon to scissor the beard, chest, and legs more than the typical show standard calls for.  If you are able and willing to brush and comb regularly we can leave the feathering to please.
The Schnauzer haircut calls for the head and ears to be clipped closely to about 1/8 of an inch.  The back and tail are to be clipped to ¼ of an inch and tapered into the sides—higher on the hips and lower on the shoulder.  The hair on the back legs is clipped to the top of the hock.  The beard is combed out and left natural while the eyebrows are scissored long and pointed, legs scissored into cylinders and chest to one inch in length.  While this is the breed standard, keep in mind that most of our Schnauzer customers want the beard and feathering scissored to avoid the hassle of crumbs in the beard and hitchhikers on the feathers.

If you have a schnauzer or are interested in one, understand that they are highly engaging, require weekly grooming at home and training to be able to accept professional grooming (clippers, dryers, bath).

The Cairn Terrier

Tuesday, April 24th, 2007 by Mike Cronk

 

Basics: 

Country of Origin:  Scotland
Group:  Terrier
Lifespan:  14 years
Height:  10 inches
Weight:  14 lbs
Color:  All colors but white,
black tipped ears, tail, muzzle
AKC Rank 2006:  48

The Cairn Terrier
Historically, the Cairn was bred to control vermin, a typical job for members of the small terrier group from Britain.  They are known as “earth dogs” from their work of chasing foxes, badgers, and rats out of their dens in the earth.  What this means for an owner is that, while they can make wonderful family pets, they would do best with older children and a fenced in yard.  Also, don’t be alarmed if they dig in the garden as is their natural inclination.

Early in our marriage, Loretta and I moved to Charlottesville and shifted from a single family home to an apartment.  I was just getting out of the service and before leaving Fort Hood Texas, I gave my German Shepherd to one of my company NCOs.  I wasn’t here long when we decided it was time for another dog—but smaller.  We happened upon Cairn Terrier pups and thought that getting a dog like Toto from “The Wizard of Oz” was great.  Scruffy proved to be lots of fun but did experience some skin allergies which are not unusual in the breed.

Cairns have a coarse primary coat and it is often accompanied by plenty of undercoat which requires brushing and combing once a week.  While it is not necessary to have clipping performed, it is accepted for the back to be cut to about 1/2 an inch in length and tapered to the sides.  The ears are clipped close inside and out.  Thinning shears are used in front of the eyes.  This is what we consider our standard “breed groom.”  Many of our Cairns get their entire body and legs done to 1/2 an inch all over to minimize at-home grooming work.  Tails are left full and lightly scissored.  Since the coat is so coarse and dense, it will matt with neglect.

 

 

Below is a Cairn with a 1.5″ puppy cut.

                                 

The Yorkshire Terrier (Yorkie)

Tuesday, April 24th, 2007 by Mike Cronk

Basics:
Country of Origin
:  England
Group:  Toy
Lifespan:  14 years
Height:  No standard
Weight:  15 lbs
Color:  Tan and blue-grey
AKC Ranking 2006:  2

The Yorkshire Terrier

The Yorkshire Terrier originated as a typical terrier of England.  It was bred and used as a ratter for the coal mines of Yorkshire.  From this rugged beginning, the use of Yorkies has evolved into that of a companion dog.  Instead of the Terrier group, they are classified as Toys.  Their personality is described by such adjectives as “bright, inquisitive, self-assured, stubborn and at times, aggressive.”  With a description like that, there is no doubt that the Yorkie’s ancestry stems from terrier heritage.  To suit their more recent use as companions, they are being consistently bred to be half their typical 14 lb size and their long satin coats are more beautiful than ever.  Yorkies tend to exercise themselves and are best with attentive adults instead of children.  They rank #2 in the AKC’s count of registered breeds.  I expect that the Yorkies of the future will continue to be smaller and happy in disposition.

The coat of a well-bred Yorkie is floor-length, straight, soft and silky.  It is believed that Maltese were part of the original breeding to give the Yorkie that lovely coat.  But owner beware—this coat requires weekly brushing followed by combing to keep it tangle-free. 

The standard breed groom calls for the top of the ears to be clipped short inside and out.  The edges are scissored to a point.  The hair between the pads and the groin area is also clipped. The coat is to be brushed and combed thoroughly.  Yorkies are bathed with our Best Luxury Shampoo and coat conditioner is optional.  The outside edges of the feet are trimmed to give them a round appearance and the skirt is lightly scissored to remove dead ends and provide a clean line. 

Most of our customers prefer the “summer cut.”  They like the chest and leg feathers to be scissored 1.5 to 2 inches in length.  With less hair comes ease of maintenance and cleanliness. 

We do a number of total body clips that range from 1/2 to 1 inch in length as well.  Most customers prefer the top knot to be scissored into bangs instead of tied up in a ponytail.  We generally scissor the face round when shorter body cuts are asked for.

Since the longer coats will require a lot of brushing at home, getting an early start on grooming is necessary (as with most breeds).  Anytime between 2 and 3 months for a first visit would be great, even if it’s just for a bath and nails.  Follow-up visits for Yorkies should be every 4-6 weeks.

“Dog Whisperer”

Tuesday, April 24th, 2007 by Mike Cronk

“Dog Whisperer” and Grooming

Cesar Millan and Treat Training

Dog Whispering — Leashes

Grooming and Breed Selection

Tuesday, April 24th, 2007 by Mike Cronk

There are a host of factors to be considered when selecting the right dog for you and the amount of grooming required should be high on the list. Want a dog who is energetic, willing to run and happy to catch your frisbies? Sounds like a Lab, Golden, or better yet, a Border Collie. But on the other hand, if you want to minimize the grooming you’d better lean toward the lab. Golden and Border Collie coats will “matt up” with neglect. Think that a short coat like a Lab or Dane will shed less? Guess again or ask any Lab owner–they shed like crazy!

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The Sense of Smell

Tuesday, April 17th, 2007 by Mike Cronk

Put your dog in the back yard and watch his behavior—more often than not his nose will go up in the air and you can see him work his nostrils and begin identifying what’s out there.  Their olfactory bulbs (scent decoding centers) are four times larger than those of humans.  Depending on the breed, it has been estimated that dogs can identify smells between 1,000 and 10,000 times better than humans can.  With this in mind, we have trained our canine friends to sniff out drugs, bombs, cancer, lost children, escaped prisoners, and the list goes on and on.  It is what is behind what I call the “Butt Check.”  Feces, urine, and associated secretions not only provide an identity between dogs but also indicate a state of health, what was for dinner, am I pregnant?, size (how high on the tree did he hike his leg?), etc

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The Mixed Breed

Tuesday, April 17th, 2007 by Mike Cronk

Basics:
Country of Origin: Everywhere.
Group:  Sometimes toy, sometimes giant,
and everything in between.
Lifespan:  Depends on my gene pool – 8-15 years.
Height and weight:  You’ll find out when I grow up.
Color:  What you see is what you get.

Archived from “The Paw Report:”  Issue #10, April

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Who is Doing the Research?

Tuesday, April 17th, 2007 by Mike Cronk

Archived from “The Paw Report:”  Issue #10, April

If you follow politics or advertising, you know that it is possible to find backing for any opinion you want—just design the question then test or experiment in such a way that you get the results you want.  In researching different topics for my own knowledge as well as sharing in the newsletter, I have to be very careful of my sources.  When writing about nutrition, I don’t value a study conducted by the Purina dog food company nearly as much as that of an independent source that doesn’t have financial ties to the outcome.  A veterinary association or the government department of health are sources I would consider more reliable.  That’s not to say that I don’t read the findings of the Purina research, I just make sure I look at other resources to see how it all adds up.  The more varied the sources are, the more likely you are to get an accurate picture.  So when you need articles about pet care, be sure to see who is doing the research and what the organization’s stakes are in the outcome of that research. 

Case in point—we have a host of scientists telling us global warming has been influenced by our behavior, yet there are also climatologists out there that think it is a natural cycle and they have graduate degrees in their field as well.  The issue has become political—it is divided along party lines with Democrats often believing in human-influenced global warming and Republicans believing in natural climate change.  Who is doing what research, what are the financial stakes and what does politics have to do with science?

Candidiasis

Tuesday, April 17th, 2007 by Mike Cronk

Whew—that’s a mouthful!  The title is the name of a yeast overgrowth which has been responsible for many problems in both man and dog.  According to “The Whole Dog Journal,” it is an “underlying cause of many skin and coat problems, food sensitivities and other symptoms in our canine companions.”  Based on this list, a lot of the coat and skin problems we see as groomers could be diagnosed as yeast infections, including: “recurring hot spots or infections of the ears, eyes, bladder or urinary tract.”

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